Falmouth, UK, 4th September 2023 / Sciad Newswire / Watson-Marlow India is undertaking several projects to support the nourishment and education of underprivileged children and their families in India. As part of these projects, Watson-Marlow provided meals for 3,330 students living below the poverty line and studying in government schools and nourishment kits to 786 vulnerable families living in labour camps.

India is ranked 107 out of 121 countries in the 2022 Global hunger Index with 35.5% of children under five not growing at a healthy rate. The COVID-19 pandemic has compounded levels of hunger and malnutrition across families in India. Children from underprivileged families are at a high risk of malnutrition. This is having a knock-on effect on school attendance, as hunger is making children unable to focus on their education.

To support the nourishment of school-aged children, Watson-Marlow is taking part in the Indian Government’s ‘Mid-Day Meal Scheme’. The scheme provides children in government and government-aided schools with a freshly cooked meal at lunchtime to avoid classroom hunger and increase school attendance. In support of the scheme, Watson-Marlow provided over 71,646 meals to 2788 school children in 16 Government Schools in Panvel for 25 days in March 2023. The project was conducted through the Akshaya Patra foundation with 470,000 INR (4,700 GBP) total investment from Watson-Marlow India.

In addition, Watson-Marlow India donated nourishment kits to 542 students with disabilities in four schools/organisations in Pune and 786 vulnerable families in three labour camps through the Food Security Foundation of India. Watson-Marlow invested 840,000 INR (8,400 GBP) into the project. The vulnerable families include those who live in slums or are daily wage earners. The projects are putting essential dry rations and staple food directly into the hands of the food insecure.

These projects are in line with Watson-Marlow’s commitment to its parent company Spirax Sarco Engineering plc’s “One Planet” strategy, which provides a roadmap for the Group to help shape a more sustainable future. A key “One Planet” initiative is to build stronger communities where the Group operates through a variety of projects, such as charitable donations and colleague volunteering.

Abhijit Takavane, General Manager, Watson-Marlow India, commented on the projects: “As a company, we have a responsibility to leave a positive impact wherever we operate and aid our local communities. Every Watson-Marlow colleague gets three days of paid volunteering a year, and that has enabled the team in India to help distribute food to vulnerable children and families. Taking part in these projects has been very rewarding, and it’s incredibly meaningful to know we have helped provide nourishment to some of the country’s most vulnerable communities.”

ENDS

For further information please contact

Joanne Lucas 
Watson-Marlow Fluid Technology Solutions 
E: joanne.lucas@wmfts.com 

Media contact: 
Jasmin Shearan / Juliette Craggs 
Sciad Communications Ltd 
T: +44 (0)20 3405 7892 
E: WatsonMarlow@sciad.com  

Notes for Editors

About Watson-Marlow Fluid Technology Solutions (WMFTS)  

Watson-Marlow Fluid Technology Solutions (WMFTS) is a world leader in manufacturing niche peristaltic pumps and associated fluid path technologies for the life sciences and process industries. WMFTS is a wholly owned subsidiary of Spirax-Sarco Engineering, with operations in 42 countries. Further information can be found at www.wmfts.com

Watson-Marlow

Watson-Marlow

Watson-Marlow Fluid Technology Solutions (WMFTS) is the world leader in niche peristaltic pumps and associated fluid path technologies for the food, pharmaceutical, chemical and environmental industries. Comprising ten established brands, each with their area of expertise, but together offering our customers unrivalled solutions for their pumping and fluid transfer applications.

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